Endangering the Welfare of a Child

Endangering the welfare of a child and various related cases involving child abuse or child neglect could lead to the harshest penalties under the law. The endangering provision in the New Jersey Code of Criminal Justice is N.J.S. 2C:24-4, which defines “child” to mean any person under the age of eighteen. The statute lists several convictions that could lead to penalties under the law, and the severity of these convictions depend on several factors including whether or not the person who endangered of the child had a legal obligation to take care of him or her.

Endangering the welfare of a child, including sexual contact with a minor, child abuse, and child neglect, is an extremely serious charge. Anyone convicted will face the consequences for the rest of their life. Our criminal defense attorneys at Ellis Law, understand the serious and delicate nature of such charges. If you or someone you love is facing charges of endangering the welfare of a child, we are willing and able to assist you throughout the criminal justice process.

Child Endangerment Law in New Jersey

According to New Jersey State Law, an individual is guilty of Endangering the Welfare of a Child in the following circumstances:

An individual who has a legal duty or responsibility for caring for the child engages in sexual contact with that child which would cause the child harm, impair the child’s morals, or cause harm in such a way that the child could be defined as an abused or neglected child as outlined in R.S. 9:6-1, R.S. 9:6-3 and P.L. 1974, c. 119, § 1. This is considered a Second Degree Offense. Any other person who engages in the conduct described above to a child younger than 16 is guilty of a Third Degree Offense.

Endangering the Welfare of a Child can include:

  • Child pornography
  • Child molestation
  • Child abuse
  • Child neglect
  • DYFS hearings
  • Sexual Assault
  • Statutory Rape
  • Driving while intoxicated while a minor is in the vehicle

Endangering the welfare of a child is typically considered a Second Degree crime and can result in 5 to 10 years in prison. If the individual is found guilty of a Third Degree Offense for Endangering the Welfare of a Child, they may face 3 to 5 years in prison. These charges may also include Megan’s Law registration requirements.

What Constitutes as Child Abuse?

NJ Law 9:6-1 further defines child abuse as constituting as:

  • Willfully forsaking a child.
  • Failing to care for and keep the control and custody of a child so that the child shall be exposed to physical or moral risk without proper and sufficient protection.
  • Failing to care for and keep the control and custody of a child so that the child shall be liable to be supported and maintained at the expense of the public, or by child caring societies or private persons not legally chargeable with its or their care, custody & control.

Cruelty to a child is defined as:

  • Inflicting unnecessarily severe corporal punishment upon a child.
  • Inflicting upon a child unnecessary suffering or pain, either mental or physical.
  • Habitually tormenting, vexing or afflicting a child.
  • Any willful act of omission or commission whereby unnecessary pain and suffering, whether mental or physical, is caused or permitted to be inflicted on a child.
  • Exposing a child to unnecessary hardship, fatigue or mental or physical strains that may tend to injure the health or physical or moral well-being of such child.
If you’ve been accused of child abuse and need representation, we can go over the details of your case and rise to your defense in the courtroom. Call us today at 888-355-4752.

Endangering the Welfare of a Child Cases

  • In People v Garajales (1999), the mere presence of marijuana in the defendants’ apartment alone was enough grounds for endangering, even though there was no physical harm being done directly to children.
  • In People v Cruz (1991), the defendant was driving an automobile with two children while intoxicated. Once again, there was no direct harm, but endangerment was still likely.
  • In People v Cenat (1997), the defendant, a mother, left her two young children unsupervised in an automobile parked on a New York City Street for two hours. Once again, no physical harm, but endangerment was still present.
  • In people v Benu (1976), the defendant, a father, arranged the marriage of his 13-year-old daughter to a 17-year-old man. Clearly, what’s acceptable in some cultures is definitely considered endangerment in the eyes of U.S. law.
If you’ve been accused of endangering the welfare of a child, representation is on your side. Call us today at 888-355-4752.

Child Abuse Attorney Near Me

If you’re ever arrested by the officer for endangering the welfare of a child, never discuss the circumstances of your case without an attorney present. If the police question you, tell them you want an attorney and refuse to answer any of their questions.
If you’ve been accused of child endangerment, you are probably looking for a fair settlement. Our team of criminal defense attorneys have over twenty years of experience in cases involving endangering the welfare of a child. Call us today at 888-355-4752 and we’ll try to get you the fair settlement you deserve.
If you’ve been convicted of endangering the welfare of a child, or have been falsely accused of doing so, our New Jersey criminal defense attorneys at Ellis Law are prepared to carefully review your case and sort out the details for the courts. Call us today at 888-355-4752 or contact us online.

[:es]Endangering the welfare of a child, including sexual contact with a minor, child abuse, and child neglect, is an extremely serious charge. Anyone convicted will face the consequences for the rest of their life. Our criminal defense attorneys at Ellis Law, P.C., understand the serious and delicate nature of such charges. If you or someone you love is facing charges of endangering the welfare of a child, we are willing and able to assist you throughout the criminal justice process.

Child Endangerment Law in New Jersey
According to New Jersey State Law, an individual is guilty of Endangering the Welfare of a Child in the following circumstances:

An individual who has a legal duty or responsibility for caring for the child engages in sexual contact with that child which would cause the child harm, impair the child’s morals, or cause harm in such a way that the child could be defined as an abused or neglected child as outlined in R.S. 9:6-1, R.S. 9:6-3 and P.L. 1974, c. 119, § 1. This is considered a Second Degree Offense. Any other person who engages in the conduct described above to a child younger than 16 is guilty of a Third Degree Offense.
Endangering the Welfare of a Child can include:

  • Child pornography
  • Child molestation
  • Child abuse
  • Child neglect
  • DYFS hearings
  • Sexual Assault
  • Statutory Rape
  • Driving while intoxicated while a minor is in the vehicle

Endangering the welfare of a child is typically considered a Second Degree crime and can result in 5 to 10 years in prison. If the individual is found guilty of a Third Degree Offense for Endangering the Welfare of a Child, they may face 3 to 5 years in prison. These charges may also include Megan’s Law registration requirements.

If you are facing charges for endangering the welfare of a child, you need a skilled attorney to help argue your case. Our criminal trial team can develop a strategy for the best possible outcome in your case. The police and other officials will begin building a case against you right away. We will help protect you. We can be reached by telephone 24 hours a day, seven days a week at 888-ELLIS-LAW (888-355-4752). We speak Spanish, Russian, Yiddish, Portuguese and Hebrew.

A Message to Our Customers About Coronavirus COVID-19:
PLEASE READ »

A Message to Our Clients About Coronavirus COVID-19:

At Ellis Law, the health, safety, and well-being of our clients, staff and business partners are our highest priorities.

The situation regarding the COVID-19 virus is continually changing, and we are following all recommended guidelines to stay healthy.

Currently, our law firm is remaining open to serve your legal needs.

We are happy to arrange for phone or video consultations should you have any concerns about keeping your scheduled appointments with us. We are also able to exchange documents via secure drives or email.

Should you have any concerns regarding an upcoming meeting with us, please contact us online or call (866) 672-8816 or 732-308-0200.

Thank you and take care.